Call for Application: The 9th Next-Generation Global Workshop

週一, 五月 30. 2016

Call for Application

The 9th Next-Generation Global Workshop

Theme:Transcultural Dynamics of Asia and Europe: Mobility, Negotiation and Transformation

Date: September 26-27, 2016

Venue: Faculty of Letters Main Building, Kyoto University


I The Purposes of the Next-Generation Global Workshop 

The Next-Generation Global Workshop (NGGW) has been held annually since 2008 to provide an opportunity for early-career scholars to present their research and to have feedback from an international audience. It has proved to be a pleasant and effective way for capacity building of early-career scholars through mentorship of professors from different universities in different areas of the world. The early-career scholars also have chances to learn from keynote speeches by the experts on the theme of the year. The NGGW has also provided invaluable opportunities for all participants to learn from other participants and to deepen the understanding of various social phenomena and perspectives encompassing social issues in respective parts of the world, particularly in Asia. Ultimately, the NGGW has served as a forum for scholars of different generations from various regions to build a common academic foundation by redefining Asia in the global context. 

*The NGGW was initiated by the Kyoto University Global COE on “Reconstruction of the Intimate and Public Spheres in 21st Century Asia” together with its international partners, and succeeded by Kyoto University Asian Studies Unit (KUASU) and its international partners, who established Kyoto International Consortium for Asian Studies (KICAS) in January, 2014.

*The participants in the NGGW in the previous years were from South Korea, China, Taiwan, The Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, India, Nepal, Malaysia, Qatar, Finland, Sweden, France, UK, Germany, The Netherlands, Hungary, Italy, USA, Canada, Australia and Japan.

The 9th Next-Generation Global Workshop is co-organized by Kyoto University Asian Studies Unit (KUASU) and The Heidelberg Center for Transcultural Studies.

II Theme: Transcultural Dynamics of Asia and Europe: Mobility, Negotiation and Transformation

The theme of this year's workshop is "Transcultural Dynamics of Asia and Europe: Mobility, Negotiation and Transformation.” The concept of “transculture” is still a newcomer to the social sciences and humanities but increasingly debated. In some discourses, the term “transculture” is used to describe processes of transformation that unfold through extended contacts and relationships between cultures, various agents, institutions and concepts. Transculturality may cover spatial mobility, circulation or flows of persons/goods/information and seeks emancipation from the limited notion of culture defined as an ethnically closed, linguistically homogenous and territorially framed juxtaposition of power and agency. 

The concept of transculturality is similar or related and, at the same time, opposing to concepts such as assimilation, convergence, cosmopolitanism, entanglement, glocalisation, hybridity, power asymmetries, syncretism, or transfer. Transculturality yields new perspectives on the dynamic nature of power (Foucault, 1976)*, and the circulation of ideas, people, and commodities in a close manner to the approach of “entangled history.”

Transculturality is also a methodological perspective. It asks to unpack established concepts, questions the nation-state as a container for knowledge and social life, and is thus highly oriented towards empirical studies of cultural and institutional processes, dynamics, conflicts, and the agents involved. In other words, transculturality “aims to investigate the multiple ways in which difference is negotiated within contacts and encounters.”

The organizer welcomes contributions from various disciplines of the social sciences and the humanities. And this is another meaning of the trans- in transculturality: To create bridges across disciplinary boundaries, bring them at one table to study the concrete dynamics of cultural exchanges between and within regions in a way no single discipline could do on its own. 

Contributions in the following fields – but not limited to them – can be considered for an application to this workshop. 

Cultural Encounters and Translation: On a macro scale, studies of cultural encounters rely often on familiar stories of domination, subjugation, hegemony, and resistance, of which one prime example is the framework of the European expansion and how Europeans came to dictate their terms to the rest of the world. However, be it “the West” or “China” that is posited as hegemon, by paying close attention to the local particulars of translations (of concepts, texts or practices) in a global context and zooming in on the agency of actors, transcultural studies can help overcome simple dichotomies of the dominant and the margin, and show how both are entangled in various ways, historically or contemporarily. In this sense, transculturality analyses the mechanisms of power and asymmetries but does not set them as a-priori before an investigation begins.

Migration, Integration and Processes of Social Inclusion/Exclusion: The movement of people – be it voluntarily, in search for work, or forced, due to war or catastrophes – often becomes a moment of friction on many levels such as appearances, family life, religions, behaviors, language, or working styles between those cast as “locals” and the “newcomers.” These newcomers may originate from far away regions of the globe, such as Syrian refugees seeking asylum in the EU, Vietnamese marriage migrants in South Korea or Taiwan, or come from within a “nation-state,” for example, after a natural and technological disaster. Even though, the social integration of such migrants is again gaining significance on the political agendas of many countries, concrete experiences of hosts and migrants also make further processes of transculturation visible. For example, physicians and judges dealing with psychological and behavioral troubles of migrants’ children have to take into account the cultural background of the parents at the same time as being obliged to reconsider the cultural biases of the rules and systems of the host country. Further, “citizenship” matters but it can be questioned at the same time regarding the inclusion of migrants into education, occupation and welfare systems. 

Flows, Counter-Flows and their Barriers: The Mobility of Objects and Practices: Not only people continuously cross borders, be they national or cultural. Also various objects, ideas, practices, policies, and institutions flow across boundaries and make processes of transculturation visible. A prime example is the historical study of tobacco that posited the circular concept of “transculturation” against the hitherto dominant idea of “acculturation,” a one-way street: Native to the island we now call Cuba, tobacco was encountered by Europeans and either thrown away as worthless leaves or demonized as smoke originating from hell, only to travel across the Atlantic and change in Europe into a commodity of luxury. Commercial interest made tobacco into a valuable item and thus also changed Cuba: The complex arrangement of practices engendered by tobacco – ritual practices, medicinal use, pleasure, and gift exchange – was simplified into a commodity of mass production. Similarly, today Bollywood cinema or Japanese animations – often cast as counter-flows to Hollywood in discourses on “soft power” – engender not only new media practices elsewhere but bring also new practice back “home.” Transculturality offers a lens for such circular movements and processes of change brought forth by objects and ideas.

M. Foucault, 1976, "Society Must Be Defended", Lectures at the Collège de France.

III  Provisional Program of the Workshop

DAY 1: September 26

9:00-15 Registration

9:15-30 Opening addresses

9:30-10:15 Keynote speech by Prof. Monica Juneja (Heidelberg University)

10:15-30 Tea break

10:30-12:00 Roundtable: "Spreading Transcultural Studies – Teaching Experiences in Heidelberg & Kyoto"

12:00-13:30 Lunch break

13:30-15:30 Session 1 (Presentations by students and early-career scholars with comments and discussions by professors and experts from various countries)

15:30-16:15 Tea break

16:15-18:15 Session 2 

18:30-20:00 Reception

DAY 2: September 27

9:00-10:00 Special lectures (By professors and experts from various universities)

10:00-15 Tea break

10:15-12:15 Session 3 

12:15-13:30 Lunch break

13:30-15:30 Session 4

15:30-16:00 Tea break

16:00-17:30 Wrap-up session

IV Application Schedule of the Workshop 

Eligibility for application: Master’s students, Ph.D. students, Ph.D. candidates, post-doctoral fellows, and those who are in early-career and non-permanent positions.

Selection: The Organizing Committee will screen the applications based on candidates' qualifications and abstracts. 

Fee for Registration: No registration fee is required

Application deadline: June 18, 2016 (Japan Standard Time)

Notification of screening result: June 24, 2016 (Provision of travel grant to be decided at this time)  Out of the 12-16 selected presenters, travel grant will be awarded to 4-5 presenters*. 

Deadline for submission of full paper (4,000-6,000 words): September 10, 2016. 

Workshop: September 26, 27. 

Proceedings: on the web around November.

Applicants should provide the following information in the application form

a) Name (please capitalize your family name) 

b) Position (Master’s student, Ph.D. student, etc.) 

c) Affiliation

d) Postal Address, Telephone Number, and Email Address

e) Whether travel grant from KUASU is needed. (Eligible applicants *only)

f) Paper Title with an abstract in English of 350-words maximum.  


*Eligibility for travel grant:  

Due to funding regulations, only regular students in master’s and Ph.D. courses at the following universities may apply for the travel award. The organizing committee will select candidates based on the quality of their abstract and the relevance to the workshop theme. 

National University of Singapore 

Chulalongkorn University 

University of the Philippines 

Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences 

Vietnam National University, Hanoi

University of Putra Malaysia 

University of Indonesia 

University of Hasanuddin

National Taiwan University 

Seoul National University 

Beijing University 

Beijing Normal University 

Beijing Foreign Studies University 

Fudan University 

Nanjing University 

University of Delhi 

Tribhuvan University 

Qatar University 

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Heidelberg University

Travel grant covers airfare and hotel accommodation for three nights according to the rules and regulations of the Kyoto University. Flights and hotels will be arranged by a travel agent for invited speakers and selected students.


The application should be sent in the application form to 

kuasu.nextgeneration★bun.kyoto-u.ac.jp(★→@) 

☞In case the information cannot be input to the form, please send the necessary items as a PDF file.

Email Subject Line should say: “Application for NGGW 2016+your name” 


Contact:  

Organizing Committee of the 9th Next-Generation Global Workshop 

Wako Asato, Björn-Ole Kamm, Hiroshi Taroumaru, Stéphane Heim, Toshiko Tsujimoto, Shoji Hirata, Kimio Ito, Emiko Ochiai, Mitsuho Nishida, Ryoko Kosugi (Kyoto University) 

Harald Fuess (Heidelberg University)

Email: kuasu.nextgeneration★bun.kyoto-u.ac.jp(★→@)

Documents



The 8th Next-Generation Global Workshop has been held at August 1 to 3. 2015

週二, 三月 22. 2016

The 8th Next-Generation Global Workshop from August 1 to 3.

Last August 1-3, 2015, the 8th Next-Generation Global Workshop was held in Kyoto University with the theme “Demographic Challenges in the Era of Global Ageing and Migration”. The workshop organized by the Kyoto University Asian Studies Unit (KUASU), succeeded from the former project of the Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) for “Reconstruction of the Intimate and Public Spheres in 21st Century Asia”.

The workshop started with keynote lectures of professors from Kyoto University and its partner universities, followed by paper presentations of individually selected twenty-four graduate students from sixteen countries: South Korea, China, Taiwan, Thailand, the Philippines, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Qatar, Turkey, France, Germany, and Japan. The scheduled sessions were arranged according to various topics such as demography, elderly care, social inclusion and many other unexplored issues. Eleven professors renowned in the field of expertise of this year’s theme acted as commentators to provide appropriate feedback and guidance to each presenter. The early career scholars expressed their impressions of the whole program of the three-day workshop as follows: “The comments given after the presentation should improve my future studies”, “A lot of questions and comments on my presentation should help me polish my paper”. “Comments from different areas were very helpful to enrich my view.”, “Aside from the formal paper presentation and Q & A time, I got a lot of inspiration from casual conversations with fellow participants” “Each country has a unique care system, which in itself is embedded in the country’s own social system. Realizing this point has incredibly widened my worldview.” “I became more optimistic by the fact that despite coming from different cultural backgrounds, we were able to understand each other to resolve the problems discussed.” 

On the 3rd of August, to further understand the super-aged society of Japan, we held a fieldtrip to explore the dimensions of labor market participation and care for the elderly. We visited four institutions, namely: 1. “Bāba Service, Pinocchio” in the Nijōjō Office of Kyoto City Silver Human Resources Center, which serves as a day care center for children, 2. North Office Kyoto City Silver Human Resources Center, 3. a community-based general care center, “Kita-ōji”, and 4. “Murasakino”, an elderly welfare center.

At Bāba Service Pinocchio, a day care center for children run by the Nijōjō Office of the Kyoto City Silver Human Resources, we were able to observe some retired nursery teachers taking care of children. We observed that they make an effort to cater to various needs of the users by flexibly organizing operation hours and allocating staffs. At the North Office of the Kyoto City Silver Human Resources Center, we were also able to have an invaluable session listening to the real-life stories of the registered elderly members who work as housekeeping supporters, gardeners and tourist guides. The active participation of retired elderly impressed foreign participants and various questions about it were raised. We were also warmly welcomed in the elderly care centers of “Kita-ōji” and “Murasakino”. A specific staff of each respective center was assigned to give us lectures on the institutions and to the daily operation of providing care for the elderly while at the same time touring the center’s facilities. We believe that the visit to these centers has given a meaningful exposure and new insights for further study because its aspect is peculiar to the Japanese welfare system. Simultaneously, we received comments from the staff members of the centers that they would reflect on their daily work objectively as an outcome of the interaction with the workshop participants who, based on their different social and cultural backgrounds, have diverse understanding of care work.

To maintain the networks that were established during the 3-day workshop, we have encouraged the participants to continue their exchanges through the recently established online platform of the Kyoto International Consortium for Asian Studies (KICAS). We also promised further development of international coordination through the credit transfer program and the exchange programs for students, researchers and professors.

This program is part of the “Re-Inventing Japan Project” and “The Top Global University Project” which will be continued in 2016.



Invitation to the Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Conference 2015 in Surabaya, Indonisia from 7-9 of August

週二, 七月 7. 2015

The Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Conference 2015

Theme of the Conference: Unearthing Hidden Social and Discursive Practices

Date: 7-9 August, 2015

Venue: Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia

Organizer: Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society, University of Indonesia and Airlangga University

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Abidin Kusno, University of British Columbia, Canada

*They have closed the call for paper. But they still accept participants. Please contact directly to the organizer about registration. For details of the conference, please refer to the offocial website



Re: Kiyozawa Manshi: A Case of the Reception of Western Philosophy in Japan

週二, 四月 21. 2015

Hi Aoki-san,

Can I ask a few questions to clarify?

1. What kind of jumping is "logical jumping"? Is it something like forgoing using one logic for another (one that is perhaps better suited for religious purposes)? Since you express it as a kind of jumping I cannot help but imagine abandoning something for something that is higher. And once you make the jump you don't return to the original? Or can you jump back and forth? Reading Slides 19 and 20, the "jump" sounds more like an "apparent gap",  the two sides being perhaps fundamentally inconsistent but nevertheless compatible. But then jumping is something you do, while gaps are just there.

2. Could you summarize for me what "match of confrontation products" is? I googled but could not find anything. And is there a strong evidence for holding that there is an "influence" from Nicholas of Cusa or Hegel to Kiyozawa rather than mere "connection" or "similarity"?

3. Seeing "Pure Land Buddhism" and "Jumping" immediately made me think of Kierkegaard, particularly about the idea of existential leap, which is essentially a religious jumping. If you are familiar with Kierkegaard, could you say a few things about your thoughts on this?

Thanks!

Itsuki



Re: An Mathematical Interpretation of I Ching

週五, 四月 10. 2015

Hi Maiko,

You showed convincingly that the Yijing (I like to follow the pinyin romanization) involves very sophisticated commitment to mathematics and numbers, and so Chinese philosophy, derived from the Yijing in one way or another, qualifies as a fully fledged rational enterprise, given your initial definition of rationality.

I have two questions, one motivated by curiosity and another by etymological concern.

First question. Do you personally believe that rationality is or should be limited to the sense in which you represented it in your presentation? Feminist epistemologists would advocate a much looser understanding (I should probably not say conception) of rationality that allows for historical, cultural and gender variation. I wonder if you would be sympathetic to this kind of orientation.

Second question. I don't know much at all about the etymology of rationality, but upon quick googling I have already come across something that challenges your move from rationality -> ratio -> mathematics (powerpoint pg. 3). Here is the website that I saw: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/217956/does-rational-come-from-ratio-or-ratio-come-from-rational

Gathering from the conversation there, it seems that the Latin ratio has both mathematical and philosophical meanings, and it is unclear whether they share the same etymology or which is primary. So to frame the question: Is it really very clear that rationality is modeled after, or essentially engaged in, mathematics?

You had 75 slides! Did you manage to go through all of them in the presentation??

Itsuki



2015 Kyoto University – Chengchi University Graduate Workshop on Asian Philosophy

週四, 三月 26. 2015

Documents



Workshop Program

週四, 三月 26. 2015

2015 Kyoto University – Chengchi University Graduate 


Workshop on Asian Philosophy

9: 30-9: 40 Opening 

9: 40-12: 00 Seminar on the Fallacy of Rejoinder (LIN & GILLON)

12: 00-13: 30 Lunch Break

13: 30-15: 15 (Ching KENG)

Ryosuke IGARASHI (KU): Negations in East and West

Maiko YAMAMORI (KU): On Ineffability

WANG Chunying (NCCU): Does Freedom Contradict Causal Exhaustion? 

– A Critical-Epistemological Resolution

15: 15-15: 45 Coffee Break 

15: 45-17:30 (DEGUCHI Yasuo)

Itsuki HAYASHI (KU): What Causes the Sprout? - Buddhist 

Momentariness and Cooperative Production

LIN Suan (NCCU): On Bhāviveka’s Logic Forms

LIN Fangmin (NCCU): A Yogācāra Error Theory of the Self

18: 00

Dinner 

Date: March 20 (Friday), 2015

Venue: Department of Philosophy, National Chengchi 

University

* 20 minutes for presentation, 15 minutes for discussion.


2015 Kyoto University – Chengchi University Graduate Workshop on Asian Philosophy

週四, 三月 26. 2015

2015 Kyoto University – Chengchi University Graduate 


Workshop on Asian Philosophy

9: 30-9: 40 Opening 

9: 40-12: 00 Seminar on the Fallacy of Rejoinder (LIN & GILLON)

12: 00-13: 30 Lunch Break

13: 30-15: 15 (Ching KENG)

Ryosuke IGARASHI (KU): Negations in East and West

Maiko YAMAMORI (KU): On Ineffability

WANG Chunying (NCCU): Does Freedom Contradict Causal Exhaustion? 

– A Critical-Epistemological Resolution

15: 15-15: 45 Coffee Break 

15: 45-17:30 (DEGUCHI Yasuo)

Itsuki HAYASHI (KU): What Causes the Sprout? - Buddhist 

Momentariness and Cooperative Production

LIN Suan (NCCU): On Bhāviveka’s Logic Forms

LIN Fangmin (NCCU): A Yogācāra Error Theory of the Self

18: 00

Dinner 

Date: March 20 (Friday), 2015

Venue: Department of Philosophy, National Chengchi 

University

* 20 minutes for presentation, 15 minutes for discussion.


Call for Application: The 8th Next-Generation Global Workshop on August 1-3, 2015

週五, 二月 13. 2015

Call for Application

The 8th Next-Generation Global Workshop

Theme: Demographic Challenges in the Era of Global Ageing and Migration

Date: August 1-3, 2015

Venue: Faculty of Letters Main Building, Kyoto University


I. The Purposes of the Next-Generation Global Workshop

Since 2008, we have organized the Next-Generation Global Workshop (NGGW) annually to provide an opportunity for early-career scholars to present their research and to have feedback from an international audience. It has proved to be a pleasant and effective way for capacity building of early-career scholars through mentorship of professors from different universities in different areas of the world.The NGGW has also provided invaluable opportunities for all participants to learn from other participants and to deepen the understanding of various social phenomena and perspectives encompassing social issues in respective parts of the world, particularly in Asia. Ultimately, the NGGW has served as a forum for scholars of different generations from various regions to build a common academic foundation by redefining Asia in the global context.

*The NGGW was initiated by the Kyoto University Global COE on “Reconstruction of the Intimate and Public Spheres in 21st Century Asia” together with its international partners, and succeeded by Kyoto University Asian Studies Unit (KUASU) and its international partners who established Kyoto International Consortium for Asian Studies (KICAS) in January, 2014.

II. Theme

The theme of this year's workshop is “Demographic Challenges in the Era of Global Ageing and Migration.”Forty years have passed since European and North American countries entered the stage of “aged society.” Japan reached the stage twenty-five years ago. In these societies, the birth rate remains below the replacement level and, in Japan, the population is actually shrinking. Due to the demographic reasons characterized by the decline in productive age population, many societies face social problems such as economic downturn and an increasing demand for care. In short, sustainability of society is in doubt.

On the other hand, many Asian countries other than Japan have enjoyed a higher proportion of productive age population, called “population bonus” or “demographic dividend” until recently. Scholars explain that the current economic boom of these regions substantially owes to their favorable demographic conditions. However,“population bonus" does not last forever. According to a recent estimate, the“early group" including South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, China, and Thailand either have already lost their benefits of“population bonus" in the 2010s or are estimated to lose it soon. The speed of ageing in the “early group”countries is more rapid than in Japan. Contrary to many industrialized countries where the transition from ageing society (more than seven percent of its population is over sixty-five of age) to aged society (more than fourteen percent of the population is over sixty-five of age) occurred gradually (i.e. the transition in France took 115 years, the United Kingdom forty-seven years, and Japan twenty-four years), South Korea and Singapore are estimated to experience its transition within eighteen years and seventeen years respectively. Such estimation of steep progress of ageing population shocks the relevant societies and urges them to prepare for the forthcoming aged society.

In contrast, the“later group" including Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, India, and the Philippines are likely to enjoy“population bonus”until the late 2030s. The difference in demographic level across the regions causes transnational migration of people and that connects the world more intimately than ever. The“later group”in Asia has served as population sending countries to the “early group”within Asia, not limited to the Western countries. Contrary to aged societies, these sending countries face different types of demographic challenges such as the massive outflow of productive population, brain drain of highly educated and skilled laborers, and women migrating as laborers or brides. Needless to say, social integration of immigrants has become a serious issue in many receiving countries.

As such, by focusing on demography we can situate ourselves at a vantage point where we can connect social phenomena unfolding in individual regions to global concerns. Moreover, demographical phenomena are more aptly predictable than other social phenomena, thus allow us to draw reliable foresights about the future. However, no frameworks have been devised to comprehensively discuss demography-related concerns across the regions. Besides, different demographic challenges and their implications in each region have not been exchanged world-widely.

Taking full advantage of hosting participants from various areas of the world, we envisage working on global demographic issues while sharing and deepening understanding of different concerns in various societies. Moreover, we aim to find an appropriate set of policies for the construction of sustainable human society by sharing both successful and failed cases in the world.

Anticipated topics to be addressed in the workshop:

  • The estimates of demography and socioeconomic conditions in every part of the world.
  • Social reforms to maintain vitality of aged society: We need to learn from each country's experience by sharing the successful and the failed cases in their implementation of measures for appropriate use of human resources, such as policies for declining birth rates, promoting women's and elderly's participation, integrating foreign nationals, and promoting sensitivity to diversity in society.
  • The future of welfare states in aged societies: Studies indicate that an increasing cost of social security in aged society is aggravating the financial status of many societies. Simultaneously, there is an increasing demand for appropriate social and labor policies concerning pension, social services, and active labor market policies, and so on. Human societies need to find an appropriate level of governmental intervention and the roles of families and communities in an aged society.
  • Policies for hosting foreign population in the phase of global migration: We need to articulate the merits and the demerits of the policies that promote both permanent settlement and temporary sojourn of migrant population. Although many countries in Asia predominantly adopt the policies for temporary migration, we need to reconsider whether aged societies can be adequately supported through such apolicy.
  • What will happen when the“later group”experiences ageing society after the 2030s? What kind of society is this“later group”going to construct? How can the global ageing human society sustain itself when the tide of global migration is weakened?
  • How the bio-politics of respective countries can affect the demographic issues in the world (i.e. one-child policy in China, the reproductive health act in the Philippines, and so forth).

III. Application

Schedule of the workshop (Japan Standard Time)

Application deadline: March 15, 2015

Notification of screening result: Early April, 2015 (Provision of travel grant to be decided at this time)

Deadline for submission of full paper (4,000-6,000 words): June 30, 2015.

Workshop: August 1st and 2nd, 2015

Fieldwork: August 3rd, 2015.

Applicants should provide the following information in pdf attachment to email:

a) Name (please capitalize your family name)

b) Paper Title

c) Position (Master's student, Ph.D. student, etc.)

d) Affiliation

e) Postal Address, Telephone Number, and Email Address

f) Name of a referee who is a faculty member in any of the KUASU overseas partner universities.

g) A 350-word maximum abstract in English.

h) Whether travel grant from KUASU is needed.

The application should be sent as a PDF file to kuasu.nextgeneration★bun.kyoto-u.ac.jp(★→@)

Email Subject Line should say: “Application for NGGW 2015”

Eligibility for application

Master's students and Ph.D. students of the KUASU overseas partner universities.

(http://www.kuasu.cpier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/english/about/partner-universities-and-research-institutes)

The Organizing Committee will screen the applications based on candidates' qualifications and abstracts.

Fee for Registration: No registration fee is required

Travel Grant: Travel grant including roundtrip airfare will be awarded to several participants according to the quality of abstract and guideline of the fund. Those who wish to apply for travel grant must clearly state it in the application. Decision notification will be made together with notification for paper acceptance.

IV. For Professors

To support capacity building of early-career scholars and active discussion in the Next-Generation workshop, we would like to ask KUASU partner professors to participate in the workshop as advisors who provide comments on the papers presented in a session. KUASU will cover the cost of hotel accommodation for the four nights in Kyoto. We apologize that we cannot cover the airfare due to budgetary constraints. Please kindly inform us of your attendance plans, including your name, affiliation, and position, not later than June 30. We would appreciate your cooperation in the program.

V. Credit and Certificate

The Next-Generation Global Workshop is recognized as a course with 2 credits at Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University. Participants from Kyoto University can receive 2 credits. Participants from other universities will receive a certificate. The partner universities are encouraged to recognize this certificate and give credits to the participants.

Contact:

Organizing Committee of the 8th Next-Generation Global Workshop, KUASU

Kimio Ito, Motoji Matsuda, Wako Asato, Toshiko Tsujimoto, Shoko Kurata (Kyoto University) and Emiko Ochiai (ENS & EHESS)

Email: kuasu.nextgeneration★bun.kyoto-u.ac.jp(★→@)

Documents



Authority structure of the site

週一, 一月 26. 2015

The authority structure of this site is very simple. Moderator manages memberships and approve posts on official pages including "Event" and "Panels." The rest part of the site, all members share the same authority. Members can edit profiles, post/reply messages, use "private communication" (including person to person and forming a communication group), manage your own account. Please try to play with the site bravely.  

Should you find any problem or come up with some advices, please kindly revert, here or in the "private communications".



How to edit my profile?

週一, 一月 26. 2015

How to edit My Profile?

When you're logging in, you are directed to the page of your "Profile"; by clicking the user icon (indicated with a red arrow in the example below), you can go to the page, too. 

Click on the button of "EDIT MY PROFILE" (indicated with a red square), you can begin to edit this page. 

One can edit one's own display name and affiliation name as one pleases.  

To manage one's own avatar, please refer to the post "How to upload and manage my avatar?"

You can use the "what you see is what you get" editor to edit your CV. Basic office skills including putting in pictures, making tables, alignment, hyperlinks can be done easily.  

 

Code mode

For those who are familiar with website code, the source code can be read and edited  in the code mode by clicking the icon of "<>" on the tool row of the editor.   Most html and iframe codes are recognized, so you can embed photos, videos and preview links to your community websites by pasting the code in the code mode.

When you click this icon "<>", the background of the editor will become black (please see below), and you can edit the code. After you complete the code, click again the icon "<>" and then check the presentation in the "what you see is what you get" editing mode. 

After you complete your CV, please press "Submit" and see what you've got with your CV. 

Additional information about RESEARCH INTEREST

One can also edit one's RESEARCH INTEREST as one pleases, but one can also add the existing PANELS or OPEN FORUMS in DIALOG into one's RESEARCH INTEREST list.  Move your cursor to the small pinion on the map, you can choose to add this topic to your RESEARCH INTEREST list. Please see below. 



How to upload and manage my avatar?

週一, 一月 26. 2015

Upload my avatar

On the platform, both the individual members and the institutional members can upload pictures to represent her-/him-/itself. 

It is very easy to upload pictures. 

First, please go to the page of "Profile" (as you log in, you are first directed to this page).  You can go back to this page easily by click the little icon of a small person on your right hand side.  (Indicated with a red arrow in the example below)

Second, please click on the button "EDIT MY PROFILE".  (Indicated with a red square in the example below) 

Third, you can either drag the file of your picture to the area of your avatar (Indicated with a red square in the example below), or you can open the upload window by clicking on the area.

Please be advised to upload the picture in the format of "gif, jpg or png."  Better you upload a file less than 256 KB and 1024 x 1024 pixels, but the files larger than the standard will be reprocessed by program automatically.  

After your file has been uploaded successfully, please click the button "submit" under the editing area.

Then, you will see your picture shown on the platform as your avatar. 

Manage my avatar

When you log in and go to the "Account Management" page by clicking the little icon of pinion on your right hand side (indicated with a red arrow in the example below), you can manage your avatars. 

To manage your avatars, please click on the option on your left hand side (indicated with a red square in the example below).

On this page, you can upload and browse all the pictures you have uploaded as your avatars before. You can choose one of them as your present avatar.



How to use Private Communication?

週一, 一月 26. 2015

Log in to use "Private Communication"

In order to use "Private Communication," users have to log in first. 

Press "Login/Logout" icon on the right hand side, type in your username and passwords, then you will see six icons.

Find the "Private Communication" icon, which is in shape of chat-cloud, press it, then you can use the service of private communications. 

E-mail notification

Users can switch on/off E-mail notification.  With e-mail notification on, users will receive system e-mail to inform of new private messages.  

From your notification e-mail, you can click on the message url in your e-mail and will be directed to "Private Communication" here in the platform.  Please be aware that only when you are logged-in, you can access the private message.  When you are not logged-in, as soon as you are directed to the platform, you should see the log-in page.  Please type in your username and passwords and log in. 

If you forget your passwords, you can retrieve your passwords via the "forget passwords" mechanism on the log-in page.  

Friends list and Groups list

Users can make friends on the platform.  Members within the same consortium/forum will be listed on the Friends list automatically.  If you want to make friends with some one on the other consortium/forum, you will find the "Friend" button on her/his profile page (Please see below).  You check it and then you've added her/him to your Friends list.

Users can also manage her/his Private Groups.  You can create a group for your own and add friends in the group. Then you can enjoy a private chatroom (group talks). 

You press "Create New Group," type in the group name and "Save" it.  Then, you add friends into the group, the way you search for your friends when editing a new message. 

 Edit new message

When you are in Private Communication, you will see the button "Edit new message," press it and type in your friend's display name, or directly select from your Friends list, you can begin to type in your message. 



「アジア日本研究ネットワーク」第2回会議開催のお知らせ

週六, 一月 24. 2015

2015年2月12日・13日に京都大学にて第2回会議を開催します。



English report of the 7th Next Generation Global Workshop

週三, 一月 14. 2015

An English report of the 7th Next Generation Global Workshop has been released in the Kyoto University's official website.

Please check out the following link:

http://www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/research/events_news/department/bungaku/news/2014/141208_1.html